Interview with HUMANITAS Winner Richard Curtis

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Richard_Curtis-main1Where are you now and what can you see?

I’m in my office looking out on a packed Portobello Road. I can see the guy with the guitar and the raggedy beard who’s been playing the same two songs for the last two hours.

What are you currently reading?

I’ve just finished reading a really beautiful novel called The Art of Fielding, one of my daughter’s favourites. I’m reading Harry Potter to/with my son – always funnier than I remember. And I’m starting my beloved friend Esther Freud’s new novel, Mr Mac and Me, an utterly gripping portrayal of the Suffolk village where we live, as it was a hundred years ago.

Choose a favourite author and say why you admire her/him

I’ve been thinking a huge amount about Roald Dahl recently, I’m doing an adaptation of Esio Trot for HBO this Christmas. I really feel he’s Dickens for children – his imagination is so various, his writing so vivid, his moral universe so delightfully perverse.

Describe the room where you usually write

My favourite writing room is by the coast in Suffolk. It looks out on a crabbing bridge and a little beach and dunes and a big sky. It’s equally inspiring come rain or shine. I wrote Snow Day there in wonderfully brutal weather two Christmasses ago.

Which fictional character most resembles you? 

I think of myself as the bland leading man in a Dickens’ novel. Pasty-faced David Copperfield, Oliver Twist, Arthur Clennam, in a vibrant world of better drawn characters.

Who is your hero/heroine from outside literature?

Bob Geldof, whose passion inspired me to give up half my life to fight against those things that outraged him. And he wears cute suits too.

Read more at The Independent: http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/richard-curtis-on-being-a-bland-leading-man-in-a-dickens-novel-9770544.html

Read another interview with Richard Curtis at Parent Dish: http://www.parentdish.co.uk/2014/10/02/richard-curtis-talks-to-parentdish-christmas-traditions-and-teen-years-snow-day/

UncategorizedJosh Neimark